The Names of God: The Holy One

, by Christopher D. Hudson

"Woe to the sinful nation,
    a people whose guilt is great,
a brood of evildoers,
    children given to corruption!
They have forsaken the Lord;
    they have spurned the Holy One of Israel
    and turned their backs on him." (Isaiah 1:4, NIV)

The people of Israel turned their backs on the Holy One because they wanted to pursue sin. But God, in his holiness, will have nothing to do with sin.

The fact that sin cannot exist in God’s holy presence should inspire us to seek forgiveness when we do something wrong. Our wrongdoing does not put our salvation in jeopardy—Jesus paid for our sins once and for all—but it does affect our closeness to God. If we have unconfessed sin in our lives, we cannot have an intimate relationship with him. We need to confess, ask forgiveness and start fresh.

Additional Verses on God's holiness:
“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty;    the whole earth is full of his glory.” (Isaiah 6:3, NIV)

“There is no one holy like the Lord;    there is no one besides you;    there is no Rock like our God." (1 Samuel 2:2, NIV)

"For it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” (1 Peter 1:16, NIV)

"For our “ 'God is a consuming fire.' ” (Hebrew 12:29, NIV)

"Who among the gods    is like you, Lord?Who is like you—    majestic in holiness,
awesome in glory,    working wonders?" (Exodus 15:11, NIV)




The above article was adapted from the Encountering God Devotional Bible, which my team created for Zondervan.
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The Names of God: I AM

, by Christopher D. Hudson

“God said to Moses, ‘I am who I am. This is what you are to say to the Israelites: “I am has sent me to you.” ’ ” (Exodus 3:14)

The Israelites were slaves in the land of Egypt, where many gods were worshiped. The Lord wanted his people to know that only one deity was worthy of their worship—only one could free them from captivity.


“I am” is the perfect name for God because it contrasts his existence with the nonexistence of other gods (who might be named “They are not”). It also calls attention to his eternal nature. When nothing else existed, God could say, “I am.” If everything else ceased to exist, God could still say, “I am.” 

Nothing changes his status.


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The above article was adapted from the Encountering God Devotional Bible, which my team created for Zondervan.
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The Names of God: Almighty

, by Christopher D. Hudson

“When Abram was ninety-nine years old, the Lord appeared to him and said, ‘I am God Almighty; walk before me faithfully and be blameless.’ ” (Genesis 17:1, NIV)

God was getting ready to do something amazing in Abram’s life. He was going to make a great nation from Abram’s descendants. The only problem was that Abram had no descendants. He and his wife were almost one hundred years old, and they had no children. That may explain why the Lord introduced himself to Abram as God Almighty. He was assuring Abram that he had all the might he needed to accomplish his plans—no matter how impossible they seemed.

Here are additional verses that identify God as Almighty:

"May God Almighty bless you and make you fruitful and increase your numbers until you become a community of peoples." (Genesis 28:3, NIV)


"I appeared to Abraham, to Isaac and to Jacob as God Almighty." (Exodus 6:3, NIV)

"David said to the Philistine, “You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied." (1 Samuel 17:45, NIV)

"And he became more and more powerful, because the LordGod Almighty was with him." (2 Samuel 5:10, NIV)
"The Lord Almighty is with us." (Psalm 46:7, NIV)

"Who is like you, Lord God Almighty? You, Lord, are mighty, and your faithfulness surrounds you." (Psalm 89:8, NIV)

" Whoever dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadow of the Almighty." (Psalm 91:1, NIV)

The good news for believers is that God has lost none of his might. He is still able to do all that he wills.





The above article was adapted from the Encountering God Devotional Bible, which my team created for Zondervan.
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God is Strength

, by Christopher D. Hudson

“David was greatly distressed because the men were talking of stoning him; each one was bitter in spirit because of his sons and daughters. But David found strength in the Lord his God.” 


David tapped into God’s strength in ways that are available to us, too. He prayed in the morning:

"In the morning, Lord, you hear my voice;
    in the morning I lay my requests before you
    and wait expectantly." (
Psalm 5:3
.) 

He poured out his complaints to God: 

"Trust in him at all times, you people;
    pour out your hearts to him,
    for God is our refuge" (
Psalm 62:8). 

He meditated on the beauty and mercy of God:
"One thing I ask from the Lord,
    this only do I seek:
that I may dwell in the house of the Lord
    all the days of my life,
to gaze on the beauty of the Lord
    and to seek him in his temple.
For in the day of trouble
    he will keep me safe in his dwelling;
he will hide me in the shelter of his sacred tent
    and set me high upon a rock.
Then my head will be exalted
    above the enemies who surround me;
at his sacred tent I will sacrifice with shouts of joy;
    I will sing and make music to the Lord.
Hear my voice when I call, Lord;
    be merciful to me and answer me."  (see Psalm 27:4–7). 

David’s renewed strength rallied his men. They returned from battle victorious, along with their families, their possessions and all that their enemies had plundered. God still makes his strength available when we look to him. With his strength we can overcome the worst times—even those days that never seem to end.


Taken from a project I edited for Zondervan in 2010 called the Busy Dad's Bible.

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Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Your Anger

, by Christopher D. Hudson

One of the best-known and oft-quoted pieces of relationship advice is found in Ephesians 4:26. That’s where the apostle Paul wrote,“Don’t get so angry that you sin. Don’t go to bed angry.” What’s remarkable about the verse, though, is not just what it says but also what it doesn’t say. The apostle Paul did not say,“Don’t get angry” or “Anger is a sin.” Instead, he warned us not to let our anger cause us to sin. Anger is a healthy emotion,every bit as valuable to our well-being as joy and grief. Anger is a natural response to upsetting circumstances. Neither does the verse say, “Don’t get angry with someone you love.” That’s unreasonable. When two people try to build a life together, conflict is inevitable. If they have problems resolving their conflicts, anger is practically a given. And that’s okay. What the apostle Paul suggested in Ephesians 4:26 is that we resolve our anger in a timely manner—ideally, within a day.

Why? One reason is that anger must not be allowed to fester. If it does, it will mutate into something uglier. Turned outward, it will become hatred; turned inward, depression. Clearing the air during your waking hours will prevent both scenarios. A second reason to work through your anger before sleep overtakes you is that it lets you get on with your life sooner. Anger—and the grudges that result from it—will occupy your thoughts until you do something about it. The more quickly you deal with it, the less your productivity will suffer. A third reason to deal with anger today instead of tomorrow is that tomorrow is promised to no one. Too many people regret their last angry words to a loved one. Don’t allow yourself to become one of them. Don’t go to bed angry.




This article was taken from a project created by my writing team: 100 Ways the Bible Can Change Your Life. Time Home Entertainment, Inc. New York, New York: 2013. p. 70.  

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Loving Enemies

, by Christopher D. Hudson

You have heard people say, “Love your neighbors and hate your enemies.” But I tell you to love your enemies and pray for anyone who mistreats you. Then you will be acting like your Father in heaven. He makes the sun rise on both good and bad people. And he sends rain for the ones who do right and for the ones who do wrong. If you love only those people who love you, will God reward you for this? Even tax collectors love their friends. If you greet only your friends, what’s so great about this? Don’t even unbelievers do that? But you must always act like your Father in heaven. (Matthew 5:43–48, CEV)

When you think of the word enemy, what images come to mind? Whose face do you see? Think of the circumstances that led to your present feelings about that person. Consider the relationship you have with the person today. And then compare your findings with Jesus’ words in the first book of the New Testament.

Jesus holds his followers to a different standard. You say you love the people who love you? So what? The worst people you know love their friends too. If you say you love your enemies, though—and prove it with the way you treat them—you’ve set yourself apart. And that’s exactly what Jesus wants his followers to do. To love your enemies is to work toward the best possible relationship with them and to learn to live at peace with them. The first step in that process is to stop any ongoing escalation of anger. If the rift or circumstances that soured your relationship are fresh, address them in a positive way. Own up to your culpability in the matter, and give the other person a chance to do the same.


This article was taken from a project created by my writing team: 100 Ways the Bible Can Change Your Life. Time Home Entertainment, Inc. New York, New York: 2013. p. 161.  
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Who Am I? (Live Video Bible Study Event)

, by Christopher D. Hudson


Join me Thursday, August 28 @ 12pm (New York Time) for a live video event. You can log in from anywhere. This broadcast will be Part 3 of the Summer Bible Study Series.

Earlier this summer we have looked at the following topics:
WHO IS GOD?

WHO IS JESUS?

Tomorrow's conclusion will overview the topic: WHO AM I? This broadcast will look at what the Bible says about those who follow Jesus. This 30 minute event will both inspire and challenge you.

DON'T FORGET TO RSVP
Reserve your place by click this link and the press the REMIND ME button on the top left.




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Gospel of Mark Challenge

, by Christopher D. Hudson

I am looking for a number of people to read the Gospel of Mark with me. We'll start Monday, August 25 and read for 2 weeks (about a chapter per day). 

Your commitment is to:

* Read the Bible everyday for two weeks.
* Commenting on a daily question in a private Facebook group. On most days, the question will simply be: 
What did you learn about Jesus from this passage?

This is low pressure way to get back into the God's Word and read the Bible. Will you join me?

There is no cost and no book to buy. The goal is simply to create a short-term group of people reading the Bible.

Two weeks. That's all. Will you join me?

[[I'm sorry, our group is full! Click the home page and join my email list to stay informed about the next one]]


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Let That Insult Slide

, by Christopher D. Hudson


“You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also. And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well. If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles. Give to the one who asks you, and do not turn away from the one who wants to borrow from you. Matthew 5:38-42, NIV
You are going about your business when someone tosses an insult your way, and not in a joking manner, either. How do you respond? Do you give back just as good as you got? Or do you ignore the person and the insult?Not surprisingly, the Bible advocates the more challenging option. “Losing your temper is foolish; ignoring an insult is smart” (Proverbs 12:16). Responding well to an insult takes self-control. It is not easy, but it can be done. Here’s how.
  1. Take a moment to mull it over. When someone insults you, pause for a couple of beats before you respond. Consider the person’s circumstances. Might he be having a bad day? Might he be taking out his frustrations on you? 
  2. Say a quick prayer. Send up a quick prayer to God. Ask him to give you the wisdom and understanding you need to respond to the insult in a way that pleases him. 
  3. Choose to take the high road. 
If you do choose to respond to the person who insults you, get his side of the story. Find out why he insulted you. Let him know how you feel about it. Whatever you do, though, don’t get drawn into a conflict. And don’t stoop to repaying insult for insult.






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Be Prepared

, by Christopher D. Hudson

It’s not often that we look to the insect world for guidance. Yet that’s exactly what Proverbs 6:6–8 encourages us to do: “You lazy people can learn by watching an anthill. Ants don’t have leaders, but they store up food during harvest season.” (CEV) Such a wise example carries four important lessons for us.

1. Harvests, literal or figurative, should not be taken for granted.
The opportunity to gather provisions—to earn money or build a surplus—is not always available. That’s why it’s important to make the most of every opportunity while we can. The ant doesn’t sit out a harvest cycle to figure out what it wants to do with its life. It gathers while the gathering is good. If you have a chance to build a surplus—to do work that rewards you with pay or benefits—do it while you can, for as long as you can.

2. Fortunes can turn in an instant.
If the “dot-com bubble” collapse of 2000–2001 or the “real estate bubble” collapse of 2007 taught us anything, it’s that when things seem too good to be true, financially speaking, they probably are.

3. Productivity should be a constant.
The author of Ecclesiastes tells us there is a season for everything, including planting and reaping (Ecclesiastes 3:2). That suggests a continuous cycle. If you do not reap when it’s time to reap, you could be out of step with the natural rhythms of life.

4. Relying on others to do the work for you is counterproductive.
Working to provide for our needs, along with the needs of our families, can give us a sense of pride, accomplishment, and purpose. The satisfaction that comes from storing up provisions—that is, from reaping the benefits of an honest day’s work—cannot be overstated. Every person who is physically capable should experience it.





This article is taken from the book my writing team and I created for Time called 100 Ways the Bible Can Change Your Life. Time Home Entertainment, Inc. New York, New York: 2013. p. 148.

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